The Foolishness of #firerickremender

Note: A while after I originally wrote this, I started to worry that it might seem condescending to some, so I rewrote it to convey a greater sense of general respect. Still working on my online etiquette.

Let’s start calling political bullying by its name.

Last week, the release of Captain America #22 was met with controversy when the Falcon was depicted waking up next to Jet Black, the daughter of Arnim Zola. Although Jet appeared to be quite young at the start of Remender’s run, time flies by fast in Dimension Z, where Captain America spent twelve years, as did Jet. By the time the Dimension Z arc ended, Jet had turned 23. However, some readers who didn’t know the full story in the book misinterpreted the Falcon-Jet scene as a case of statutory rape. Afterward, people wanted Remender fired, and they wanted the rest of us to stop buying Remender’s books. There’s even a hashtag dedicated to getting Remender fired.

Look. I’m sorry, people, but you don’t speak for me, you don’t tell me what I can and can’t buy, and you have no right to try to pressure a whole company to fire one of their hard-working employees who did nothing to hurt you!

Getting into the comics industry is extremely difficult. There are certain hurdles that one must make it past. It’s not easy. Are we supposed to believe that fiction of all things warrants losing a job?

Furthermore, we are talking about a fictional story in a comic book. Trying to get someone fired over comics is hateful. It’s very simple. If you are participating in the #firerickremender campaign, then, sit back and think. Would you want to be the victim of a hate campaign?

Equating a fictional story to real-world crimes is highly insulting both to the story’s creators and real victims of crime. If I were ever asked “What more important, fictional characters or real people?”, I would promptly answer “Real people, of course.”

That’s all I’m going to say on the matter. See ya next time.

-Dan

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